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Private Owner Wagon Kits

   Our P.O. kits represent wagons used during the period 1898-1948, when privately owned stock amounted to around 500,000 wagons - about half the total of all the wagons registered during the inter-war period.
   Our kits cover the body styles of a number of builders – Gloucester, Hurst Nelson and Wheeler & Gregory. However, the underframe is either RCH 1923 16' 6", or Gloucester 15'/16' type
See also: Cambrian Railways wagons on the GWR page here… The 2 plank was similar to those used by contractors, and perhaps quarry owners. There were Privately Owner 4 plank wagons, with similar bodies – there is a picture of one on the Cromford & High Peak line in Derbyshire. Many wagons would have had brakes on one side only, until about 1924 (wagons with Gloucester type solebars), when a second set had to be fitted.
   Alan Gibson or Romford wheels are recommended. Avoid "RTR" types such as Hornby or Bachmann as these may be larger than the kit is designed for – fitting couplings could be difficult; the axle length may also be shorter.

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   Some owners ran or leased thousands of wagons e.g. Rickett(s), & Cory; while small coal merchants might own as little as one wagon, although they sometimes concealled this by numbering their wagons from 100 etc. New wagons might be given the next number in sequence although earlier wagons might have been scrapped, giving the impression of a large fleet.
   Large collieries & factors' wagons would run to areas far from the home base e.g. Ocean and GLM (seen in Devon & Sussex). Welsh steam coal was sent all over the country for ships' bunkering. Local coal merchants' wagons would only be found in their 'home' goods yard or en route to, or from a colliery. Sometimes they might also be sent to a wagon works for repairs. The exception to this was during World War II when all P.O. wagons were requistioned by the Government and pooled. This led to PO wagons being dispersed over time. They were also used for purposes for which they weren't suited – a photo (1941) shows a mixture of PO wagons being used to collect sleepers from the Van branch in mid-Wales. Getting sleepers in through the door of a coal wagon must have been a difficult task.
    Following Nationalisation in 1948, PO wagons were renumbered in a "P" prefixed series and painted (if they were lucky) in Unfitted-stock Grey. There was a massive building programme of 16ton steel mineral wagons in the 1950s which made the PO wagons redundant. Some lingered on in engineers' use, and also the National Coal Board (NCB) had many as internal users. Some of the latter lasted until the 1980s, although they may rarely have moved from NCB sidings such as "Landsale Yards" e.g. near Ammanford in South Wales.

C30 10ton 7-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' Glos. 1907 type)

10 Ton Fixed end

Inside strapping. Small coal merchants liked these.
(Of course we mean the size of their business, not how tall they were)

C32 12ton 5-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (16' 6" RCH 1923 type)

RCH 5 plank open

Gloucester RCW type with strap across top plank of doors & "planked" floor, without bottom doors.
Parkside Models do a different version without the bar across the top of the door, which is also deeper, & steel floor.
These were used for roadstone (sometimes tarred, hence the steel floor). See it here…

C36 12ton 7-plank End Door Wagon Kit (16' Glos. 1907 type)

PO 12ton End Door

Outside strapping. Full height end door (inside hinge bar)

C44 10ton 5-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' Glos. 1907 type)

Glos 5 plank

Inside strapping. Includes choice of flat or raised ends. (Flat end type shown)

C49 10ton 6½-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' Glos. 1907 type)

Glos 6½ plank wagon

The prototype wagons had a lifting section over the doors.
This may mean that the wagons sometimes carried merchandise other than coal, such as bagged fertiliser in the Spring or Summer.

C51 12ton 5-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (16' Glos. 1907 type)

Glos 5 plank open

Includes choice of flat or raised ends. (Flat end type shown)

C52 10ton 5-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' Hurst Nelson type)

Hurst Nelson 5 plank open

Outside strapping. Includes choice of flat or rounded ends. (Rounded end type shown)
Although Hurst Nelson’s works were in Motherwell, their salesmen reached right to the south coast of England,
as afterwards did their wagons (persuasive chaps, it seems).

C53 10ton 4-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' "Wheeler & Gregory")

Wheeler & Gregory 4 plank open

Low rounded ends. Somerset Coalfield type.
Wheeler & Gregory’s works were in Radstock adjacent to the Somerset and Dorset line.
See also below: C74 4 plank with 3plank door & raised ends.

Photo of W & G Works (1) ◊  Photo of W & G Works (2) ◊  Timber Yard, Radstock

C60 10ton 1-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' Glos. 1907 type)

glos one plank open

Low sided wagon for stone blocks. Single "eleven-inch" plank body.

C61 12ton 5-plank End Door Wagon Kit (16' 6" RCH 1923 type)

RCH 5 plank open

Used for china clay or roadstone. Longitudinal "planked" floor – this avoided material collecting in the plank gaps when tipped.
This picture of derailed wagons shows that BR china clay wagons also had longitudinal planks.

C62 10ton 6½-plank Wagon Kit (16' Glos. 1907 type)

Glos 6½ plank open

The prototype wagons had a lifting section over the doors (see C49 above).

C63 7-plank "Convertible" Coke Wagon Kit (16' 6" RCH 1923 type)

RCH coke wagon

Includes 2 plank Coke Raves and fixing bolt detail on the wagon body. "Bottom door" floor.
The coke raves or rails could be removed when loading coal (otherwise the wagon could be overloaded).
Some wagons had two "Tare" weights marked for with and without the rails.

C74 4-plank Fixed End Wagon Kit (15' 0" "Wheeler & Gregory")

4 plank wagon

4 plank with 3 plank door & low raised ends. Somerset Coalfield type.
Wheeler & Gregory’s works were in Radstock adjacent to the Somerset and Dorset line.
John Snow of Glastonbury and Bristol had wagons of this type.

C75 8-plank Acid Jar Wagon Kit (16' 6" RCH 1923 type)

RCH coke wagon

This wagon, operated by "Chance & Hunt", had 8 jars fixed inside with the lids protruding through a planked "roof" set just below the top of the sides.
It is unknown how the acid was removed from the jars – presumably syphoned out using rubber tubing, but not started by sucking on the end of the pipe (not more than once, anyway).
By coincidence, the parent company of our current polystyrene supplier was until recently Chance & Hunt (previously a founder company of ICI).
Transfers for this kit are available from POWsides, reference no.122

These body types may be introduced later – Butterley Steel Open, Glos. 15'  3 plank open and RCH 3 plank dropside brick wagon.